How Might your Community and Primary Care Reduce the Impact of Financial Strain

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This website is a place where you can share your insights, experiences, and ideas in reducing impact on financial strain in your community.

Income is one of the most important factors that influences health. Financial strain is economic pressure that can cause stress and harm health.

Digital stories are a powerful way to create a meaningful discussion and simulate thoughtful change. We invite you to share the short videos with your teams, discuss what resonates (you may wish to use the questions at the end), what changes you might want to make and engage with others already doing this work using our Map and Forum.

The ‘Reducing the Impact of Financial Strain (RIFS)’ project will strengthen connections between community members and organizations including primary care teams. The aim is to collaboratively design local solutions to support health by addressing financial concerns in a sensitive, compassionate and sustainable way. While community looks at improving supports, Primary Care teams identify and support patients with financial concerns and help them access appropriate community supports.

Check back often for more videos and participate in the forum discussion

This website is a place where you can share your insights, experiences, and ideas in reducing impact on financial strain in your community.

Income is one of the most important factors that influences health. Financial strain is economic pressure that can cause stress and harm health.

Digital stories are a powerful way to create a meaningful discussion and simulate thoughtful change. We invite you to share the short videos with your teams, discuss what resonates (you may wish to use the questions at the end), what changes you might want to make and engage with others already doing this work using our Map and Forum.

The ‘Reducing the Impact of Financial Strain (RIFS)’ project will strengthen connections between community members and organizations including primary care teams. The aim is to collaboratively design local solutions to support health by addressing financial concerns in a sensitive, compassionate and sustainable way. While community looks at improving supports, Primary Care teams identify and support patients with financial concerns and help them access appropriate community supports.

Check back often for more videos and participate in the forum discussion

  • RIFS Summary

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  • Take a Closer Look. The impact of financial strain on health.

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    RIFS Project Infographic.

  • McLeod River PCN RIFS team recognized for improving health journeys

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    One of the teams working on the Reducing the Impacts of Financial Strain (RIFS) project has received a Patient Experience Award from the Health Quality Council of Alberta.

    This annual award goes to initiatives that improve the way patients receive healthcare services. It’s a daunting mandate, but RIFS fits the bill perfectly. Since income is one of the most powerful determinants of health, RIFS has enormous potential to give people in Alberta a better experience throughout their health journeys.

    The award recognizes the contributions of one RIFS team, the Life Medical Clinic and the McLeod River Primary Care Network (PCN). They embedded screening questions that uncover the patient’s full picture, open up life-changing conversations and establish relevant community connections.

    Asking a simple question like, “Do you ever have trouble making ends meet?” can spark dialogue that helps providers get a holistic view of the patient and use a broader socio-economic context to offer support. Providers can then connect patients to the right community services at the right time.

    Informing this work was a collaborative effort by the RIFS team to understand what matters most to the patient and how their social needs impact their health. The end goal? To create a safe space for conversations about finances and health.

    A key member of the team, Dr. Joseph Ojedokun of the McLeod River PCN, echoes the importance of open conversations about contextual issues like financial strain: “Ask what matters. Listen to what matters. Do what matters.”

    Not surprisingly, this multidisciplinary project is backed by a diverse team, including the AHS Provincial Population and Public Health (PPPH) and Primary Health Care programs and their Strategic Clinical and Integration (PHC IN) Networks, and the Alberta Medical Association (AMA).

    The clinic and PCN together with Zone level Public Health was part of a community-based multi-sectoral team that mapped out and engaged with local agencies that could provide appropriate support for each patient and for community members who may not be accessing the health system.

    This team also co-designed actions that mobilized community partners to collectively identify local assets and respond to local needs, such as partnering with the local library to provide equal access to Wi-Fi and a computer lending program that aims to facilitate citizens accessing benefits, services and/or employment opportunities that promote financial wellbeing.

    The RIFS project has now been piloted by three PCN-Zone-Community sites: McLeod River (North Zone), St. Albert Sturgeon (Edmonton Zone) and Kalyna Country (Central Zone). The project was co-designed locally with each clinic, PCN and community partnership.

    We invite you to watch the RIFS digital stories and discuss with your team: Tara's and Lacey's narratives were developed by the Life Medical Clinic and the McLeod River PCN. You’ll see how reducing financial strain, in partnership with community, can change patients’ lives for the better.

    You can also listen to Tara, Lacey and Dr. Joseph share their experiences as part of a panel of presenters in the ChangeMaker webinar. Join us in congratulating this team for their Patient Experience Award!


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  • Primary Care Screening Tool for financial strain

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    Family physicians and other health professionals use this screening tool to learn about how financial strain affects their patients. The tool is:

    • Individualized for Alberta and incorporates local resources and supports
    • Designed for quick and intuitive use in day-to-day practice
    • Endorsed by the CFPC and its provincial Chapters

    Do you ask this question to patients?


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  • Building Financial Well-Being A COMMUNITY PLANNING TOOLKIT

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    What strategies promote financial well-being in your community. To inspire and energize your community to act on financial well-being, use this toolkit to explore:

    • implementation details
    • tips on how to get started, and
    • stories and insights from organizations across Alberta and Canada.
    What has worked in your community?

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  • Helping deal with Financial Stain and Impact from COVID-19

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    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
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    Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has” Margaret Mead

    There are so many inspiring stories of communities working together and showing kindness. Tell us what your community has done to support those dealing with financial strain. Many communities and organizations have put together ways that individuals and families can get local, provincial and federal support. Check it out

    Morinville

    Whitecourt

    Vermilion

    Viking

    Greater Edmonton

    Greater Edmonton Seniors

    AHS Help in Tough Times

    211 Alberta is building a comprehensive Information and Referral system accessible to all Albertans. The 211 system is an enhancement, not a replacement, of local Information & Referral services currently operating across the province. If you see a listing that should be posted on 211, please suggest a new listing.

    What resources and services are in your community that help people with the stresses and financial challenges of COVID-19? What provincial and federal programs have you leveraged or heard are helpful? Share what has helped you and what would be helpful?

  • Sherry & Her Dogs: Story of Financial Strain, Relationship Strain and Mental Health Strain

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    Sherry (not her real name) is a 66 year old female residing in small town close to an urban center. She is married with no children. Sherry has been unemployed for the past year related to her depression and PTSD. She was a member of the armed forces and has worked as a counsellor in the past. She is hoping to return to work soon; currently work opportunities are minimal and contract based. Sherry does not have a car, which limits her employment opportunities as public transit to the urban areas is not available. A temporary contract may be offered to Sherry in March, but will require relocation to Quebec.

    Sherry has a tumultuous relationship with her husband of 10 years. He pays the rent and Sherry’s CCP is just enough to cover other basic expenses (food, meds and transportation). Sherry is concerned that if she separates from her husband, related to the stress in their relationship, she may need to move from her current residence of 10 years. Sherry has 3 dogs, she states are her children. She is unaware of any affordable housing that will support her dogs.

    Sherry’s husband has a history of mental illness which may jeopardize her mental and emotional safety. Sherry feels trapped in her unhealthy relationship; she states she stays as it provides financial stability. She is struggling to make life changes related to the inability to access affordable housing and the potential loss of her dogs. Uncertainty of increased financial strain has decreased her ability to care for her own mental health as she attempts to re-enter employment.

    Her primary care team plans to:

    · Connect her with Alberta Supports to see if she would qualify for the rent supplement program, if she is estranged from her spouse.

    · Provide local community support for application of emergency funding in case finds self without housing or being able to pay rent while transitioning.

    How can the health system and community best assist Sherry? How might we support people like Sherry to continue living with their four legged family members? How might Sherry’s health be impacted? Share your story with us.


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  • Webinar - Clinic and Community: Making the Connections

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    Join us online Feb 12 to help solve real-life challenges around linking clinic and community services. How might we foster connections/relationships that support financial wellness?

    • Hear patient experiences, success stories & practical tips.
    • Share your experiences, challenges and successes.
    • Help find solutions and join in the lively discussion.




  • Graphically Recording the Vermilion Poverty Simulation

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    Check out this unique way that the learnings from the Poverty simulation event was captured. Vermilion can watch around town for the graphic recording of their Poverty Simulation thanks to Aaron Russell, a graphic recorder with AHS. As the community and Primary Care Network work towards addressing financial strain, this super sized graphic can serve as a remind of the experiences people go through and to start from a place of empathy. What stands out for you?

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  • Hopes and Dreams of Committed Community Members

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    An inclusive community with no service barriers or bias and has increased integration and collaboration to maximize the level of supports to community members are just some of the hopes and dreams of 21 Whitecourt community members that attended the first RIFS coalition meeting in September.


    When they dreamed of Whitecourt's financial wellness in two years here are some of their thoughts: Families adjusting to lower income levels; Alternative safe housing for our at risk teens; Children that do not shoulder financial strain; No limits set on children/youth due to finances; Affordable housing for everyone who needs it, when they need it; Healthy food for all; More part-time meaningful employment opportunities for those with barriers.

    They hope that working together on RIFS, will lead to greater understanding of community and social services, financial education, positive attitudes towards those who are struggling, interconnection between support services, and engagement of community members. Check out the meeting summary. Do their hopes and dreams ring true for you?

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