Join the conversation about COVID-19

Albertans have been dealing with the impacts of COVID-19 for a year. We must remain vigilant to protect one another and our healthcare system. It is as important as ever to follow advice from Alberta’s Chief Medical Officer of Health and to take voluntary and mandatory restrictions seriously.

Vaccines are a critical way to limit the spread of COVID-19. They are effective and safe for protecting our health, as well as the health of our families and community members. Alberta Health, with input from AHS, has identified key populations to be included in a phased approach to the immunization roll out in Alberta. Our goal is to immunize Albertans as safely and effectively as possible; beginning with acute care sites with the highest COVID-19 capacity concerns.

Follow AHS on Facebook and Twitter for up-to-the-minute updates on COVID vaccine availability and other current news.

Albertans have been dealing with the impacts of COVID-19 for a year. We must remain vigilant to protect one another and our healthcare system. It is as important as ever to follow advice from Alberta’s Chief Medical Officer of Health and to take voluntary and mandatory restrictions seriously.

Vaccines are a critical way to limit the spread of COVID-19. They are effective and safe for protecting our health, as well as the health of our families and community members. Alberta Health, with input from AHS, has identified key populations to be included in a phased approach to the immunization roll out in Alberta. Our goal is to immunize Albertans as safely and effectively as possible; beginning with acute care sites with the highest COVID-19 capacity concerns.

Follow AHS on Facebook and Twitter for up-to-the-minute updates on COVID vaccine availability and other current news.

COVID Fact or Fiction

Have you heard a comment about COVID-19 that you want to fact check? Look no further! 

Post your comment here and an AHS expert will provide accurate and up-to-date information to validate or debunk your post as fact or fiction!

By providing us with your email you will be notified when a response to your post is provided or updated. This notification is automatically generated and your email will not be used for any other purposes.

You can also find answers to commonly asked questions on our public and staff FAQs. For other information about COVID-19 visit www.ahs.ca/covid

loader image
Didn't receive confirmation?
Seems like you are already registered, please provide the password. Forgot your password? Create a new one now.
  • Where can I find the past research done with similar proteins head 'vaccination' done on animals looking at results over multiple generations. I heard from two well established-credible scientists that there has been 'no' successful research on animals using a similar corona virus vaccination as ones currently being used for COVID0-19.

    PepperB asked 3 days ago

    The creation of every vaccine features several important steps - including cellular work, animal studies and human clinical trials, all of which are necessary in order to develop safe and effective vaccines.

    Although vaccines for coronaviruses has been explored in the past, there hadn’t been significant resources put towards developing these vaccines prior to the COVID-19 outbreak.  

    Health Canada, which is the governing body responsible for the review and approval of vaccines in Canada, conducts thorough and independent reviews of all vaccine data prior to vaccines being approved for use in Canada. For COVID-19 vaccines, Health Canada is using a fast-tracked process that allows manufacturers to submit data as it becomes available, and for Health Canada experts to start the review process right away. So while the review process is expedited, no steps are skipped.

    Learn more about the development and approval of vaccines in Canada.

    You may also find interesting information through Americans for Medical Progress; this is a US based research group so not all of the information they provide is relevant to the Canadian context. However, the site includes is a list of links to research on the Role of Animals in Developing COVID-19 Treatments and Vaccines.

    Dr. Kristin Klein, Medical Officer of Health, Provincial Population and Public Health, and Co-Lead of AHS’ COVID Vaccine Task Force

  • 1. MRNA vaccines: when our bodies produce the spike protein, does the spike protein get secreted into our plasma and circulated? Or does it stay on the surface of cells that produce it? 2.MRNA vaccines: how long does this mRNA stay in our bodies? Is it causing us to produce spike protein indefinitely? 3. If our “self” produces the spike protein, what are the theoretical risks of eliciting auto-immune diseases? 4. Do people who are vaccinated shed spike protein to those around them? 5. What are the menstrual changes caused by the vaccines? 6. Don’t viruses eventually generally mutate to a less virulent form? Can’t we just wait out this pandemic? 7. Does the lipid casing of the mRNA enable it to cross the blood brain barrier? What effects could that have? 8. What are the theoretical long term risks or effects of taking the mRNA vaccine?

    Levesque asked about 1 month ago

    Thank you for your questions.

    None of the vaccines approved for use in Canada contain actual spike protein from COVID-19, or the live COVID-19 virus. COVID-19 vaccines instruct the body to produce spike proteins that teach the immune system to combat the spikes on the coronavirus.

    The spike proteins that coat the coronavirus allow the virus to easily infect the human cell and replicate. The amounts that are made after the mRNA is injected are very small, and it almost exclusively stay locally - at the site of injection or the local lymph nodes. The vaccine works by teaching the immune system to fight off the spike protein in the body and get rid of it. 

    There is no way a vaccinated person could shed the virus, because the vaccine does not contain the virus.

    Medical experts continue to assert that the COVID-19 vaccine does not impact fertility or women’s menstrual cycles. Confusion around this issue arose when a false report surfaced on social media, saying that the spike protein on this coronavirus was the same as another spike protein called syncitin-1 that is involved in the growth and attachment of the placenta during pregnancy. The false report said that getting the COVID-19 vaccine would cause a woman’s body to fight this different spike protein and affect her fertility. The two spike proteins are completely different, and getting the COVID-19 vaccine will not affect the fertility of women who are seeking to become pregnant. 

    The vaccines have been proven safe and effective through clinical trials and the millions of people who have received the vaccines around the world. Learn more about the mRNA vaccines here.

    Dr. Kristin Klein, Medical Officer of Health, Provincial Population and Public Health, and Co-Lead of AHS’ COVID Vaccine Task Force

  • Is it possible that the spike protein itself is pathogenic? Can we inadvertently cause damage to our organs as our cells are trained to produce the spike protein through mRNA vaccines? Could this possibly cause damage to the developing reproductive organs of pubescent biological females now that mRNA vaccines are approved for children as young as 12? Thank you in advance for your time and expertise regarding this matter.

    Hugo Flores asked 27 days ago

    No, this is false. COVID-19 vaccines instruct your body to produce spike proteins that teach your immune system to recognize the spikes on the coronavirus. The spike protein is immunogenic, meaning it causes an immune response, but it is not a toxin.

    None of the vaccines approved for use in Canada contain actual spike protein from COVID-19, or the live COVID-19 virus. The spike proteins that coat the coronavirus allow the virus to easily infect the human cell and replicate. The amounts that are made after the mRNA is injected are very small and it almost exclusively stays locally. The vaccine works by teaching the immune system to fight off the coronavirus in the body. 

    The vaccines have been proven safe and effective through clinical trials and the millions of people who have received the vaccines around the world.

    Dr. Kristin Klein, Medical Officer of Health, Provincial Population and Public Health, and Co-Lead of AHS’ COVID Vaccine Task Force

  • Does the Covid 19 spike protein cross the blood/brain barrier in its natural state? If so, does the same hold true for synthetic mRNA via vaccination?

    Hugo Flores asked 27 days ago

    No, this is not true. The vaccines do not contain spike proteins. 

    COVID-19 vaccines instruct your body to produce spike proteins that teach your immune system to combat the spikes on the coronavirus. The amounts that are made after you receive the mRNA vaccine are very small, and it almost exclusively stay locally - at the site of injection or the local lymph nodes.

    Dr. Kristin Klein, Medical Officer of Health, Provincial Population and Public Health, and Co-Lead of AHS’ COVID Vaccine Task Force

  • Recently, I have encounter friends and acquaintances who are taking the "wait and see" approach to getting the vaccine. This means that they are waiting to see cases go up again to get their vaccine or they are waiting for more statistics to arise regarding bad side affects. Can you tell me why this is not a good strategy to fight the pandemic?

    Elizabeth asked 3 days ago

    Thank you, this is an excellent question. There are a number of reasons to get vaccinated – the primary reason being that you are less likely to become sick with, or die from, COVID-19. Vaccines make your immune system stronger. They build antibodies to help prevent diseases. And in studies around the world they have been proven safe and effective.

    As well as protecting yourself, immunization is the single most effective means of protecting your loved ones from COVID-19. People can transmit the coronavirus to others if they’re infected, even when no symptoms are present. The COVID-19 vaccine ensures you are not spreading COVID to the people around you - including family members and friends who may be susceptible to more serious and long-lasting impacts of the illness, and those who cannot be vaccinated.

    Another reason to consider a COVID-19 vaccine is to protect the health of the broader community. Each child or adult infected with the coronavirus provides a chance for the virus to mutate and create a variant that might prove more dangerous or resistant to the available vaccines and therapies. Fewer overall infections among the population means less chance of dangerous coronavirus variants.

    AHS recommends that all eligible Albertans take their first available opportunity to be immunized to protect themselves, their families, and their communities.

    Dr. Kristin Klein, Medical Officer of Health, Provincial Population and Public Health, and Co-Lead of AHS’ COVID Vaccine Task Force

  • As of May 25th, the vaccination rate in the County of 40 Mile is at 24.7%. In the May 25th edition of the 40 Mile County Commentator, elected officials stated that this low rate is because of a lack of vaccine supply. Neither of them cited the source of this information. What is the current vaccine supply to the County of 40 Mile? Is our low rate of immunization because of a lack of vaccine supply?

    Steph asked 28 days ago

    There are a number of available appointments for first appointments across Alberta. You can book your appointment at an AHS clinic or participating pharmacy. There are also a number of physicians’ offices in communities offering vaccination, you can try calling your local physicians office if you are unable to find a clinic in your community.

  • I am very interested in the Medicago Virus-Like Particle vaccine trial that is currently in phase three. If one were to volunteer for this trial and antibody response is noted, would that count statistically for being vaccinated and meeting the desired percentage of population for re-opening? I am very enthusiastic about made in Canada solutions but do not want to subject myself to additional injections of newly developed products. Thanks!

    RG Smith asked 27 days ago

    Health Canada is responsible for the authorization of vaccines in Canada, including trials. You can read more information about the products that are authorized for use and the specific details about their authorization here. New information about federal investments in vaccine development can be found here: Backgrounder – Government of Canada investments in COVID-19 vaccines, therapeutics and biomanufacturing capacity - Canada.ca

  • What were the demographics of the children used to determine that the Pfizer mRNA vaccine is safe for kids 12 and up? Is there any understanding of future reproductive issues? Considering the period changes anecdotally noted by many women, is there any established concern for the reproductive health of children, especially women, but also young boys with developing testes? Could we have opened a pandoras box of infertility and sterility inadvertently with the introduction of a spike protein which seems to, at least in some cases bind to reproductive tissues. I want my children safe but call me selfish, I want grandchildren too! HAHA

    Hugo Flores asked 26 days ago

    The safety and efficacy of the COVID-19 vaccine in children between 12 to 15 years of age has been established for the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. Manufacturers are conducting clinical trials in this age group and younger children, which will help inform recommendations about use in children once more data become available. Currently, the Pfizer vaccine is licensed for individuals 12 years and older and the Moderna and AstraZeneca vaccines are licensed for individuals 18 years of age and older.

    Health Canada is responsible for the approval of all vaccines in Canada, you can find information about how vaccines were approved, including information about trials in the product monograph under information for healthcare professionals or researchers when you click on each the vaccine – Pfizer.  

    Medical experts continue to assert that the COVID-19 vaccine does not impact fertility. Confusion around this issue arose when a false report surfaced on social media, saying that the spike protein on this coronavirus was the same as another spike protein called syncitin-1 that is involved in the growth and attachment of the placenta during pregnancy. The false report said that getting the COVID-19 vaccine would cause a woman’s body to fight this different spike protein and affect her fertility. The two spike proteins are completely different, and getting the COVID-19 vaccine will not affect the fertility of women who are seeking to become pregnant. 

    You can read more here: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/the-covid19-vaccine-and-pregnancy-what-you-need-to-know.

    Dr. Kristin Klein, Medical Officer of Health, Provincial Population and Public Health, and Co-Lead of AHS’ COVID Vaccine Task Force

  • Will there be any changes to the approved vaccination now that the risk of myocarditis with the mRNA shots has been established to occur in some proportion of young males?

    Hugo Flores asked 21 days ago

    In Canada, there have been a small number of reports of pericarditis or myocarditis (PDF), following vaccination with a COVID-19 mRNA vaccine, however it is important to note that adverse events occurring after vaccination are not necessarily related to the vaccine. 

    These cases have occurred mainly in adolescents and young adults; more often in males than females; and more commonly after the second dose. Most cases have been mild and typically occur within several days after vaccination. 

    Based on the few reports received in Canada, we are not currently seeing higher rates than would be expected in the general population. We are continuing to follow the emerging evidence on this topic very closely. The Canadian weekly online adverse events report provides updates on the latest numbers. More information is available here.

    Dr. Kristin Klein, Medical Officer of Health, Provincial Population and Public Health, and Co-Lead of AHS’ COVID Vaccine Task Force

  • I have a client who is strongly opposed to vaccinating his 12year old for several reasons. He states: 1) "children very rarely get severe illness or require hospitalization" 2) "children aren't know as being common transmitters of the virus" ("so the herd immunity factor doesn't really fit for them") 3) "the vaccine manufactures clearly state that they don't prevent transmission". This client wants to see the research indicting otherwise. I am curious how you would approach this question? I am well versed in vaccine hesitancy conversations, but the anti-vaxxer conversation is hard. This person also does not believe the vaccine is contributing to the decrease in case rates. Stating that, it is "the natural progression or the disease". Please help!!!

    helpplz asked 21 days ago

    The safety and efficacy of the COVID-19 vaccine in children between 12 to 15 years of age has been established for the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. Manufacturers are conducting clinical trials in this age group and younger children, which will help inform recommendations about use in children once more data become available. Currently, the Pfizer vaccine is licensed for individuals 12 years and older and the Moderna and AstraZeneca vaccines are licensed for individuals 18 years of age and older.

    Although COVID-19 in children is usually milder than in adults, some kids can get very sick and have complications or long-lasting symptoms that affect their health and well-being. The virus can cause death in children although this is more rare than for adults.

    Like adults, children also can transmit the coronavirus to others if they’re infected, even when no symptoms are present. The COVID-19 vaccine protects against this potential harm to the child and others, including family members and friends who may be susceptible.

    Another reason to consider a COVID-19 vaccine for your child is to protect the health of the broader community. Each child or adult infected with the coronavirus provides a chance for the virus to mutate and create a variant that might prove more dangerous or resistant to the available vaccines and therapies. Fewer overall infections among the population means less chance of dangerous coronavirus variants.

    The Canadian Pediatric Society has recommended that the Pfizer vaccine be offered to all children and adolescents 12 years of age and older. 

    Dr. Kristin Klein, Medical Officer of Health, Provincial Population and Public Health, and Co-Lead of AHS’ COVID Vaccine Task Force