2022 National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

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Thank you for taking part in the 2022 National Day for Truth and Reconciliation.  We encourage you to continue to explore ways to put reconciliation into action.

Sings Many Songs Women (Pearl White Quills, Deb Green and Noreen Demeria) sang for the opening of the healing garden at the Alberta Children's Hospital, a place of refuge for patients, staff and physicians. Photo courtesy of Albert Woo

Wearing an orange shirt symbolizes the harm done to residential school students and their families, and shows a commitment to the principle that every child matters. By acknowledging and understanding the truth of the past, we can take steps to move forward towards reconciliation.

AHS has been commemorating Orange Shirt Day on September 30 for many years, to recognize the history and truthful impacts of residential schools in Alberta. The Orange Shirt Day movement started in 2013 after a Residential School Survivor spoke about having the orange shirt her grandmother bought for her taken away on her first day of school when she was 6 years old. Read her story here.

In 2021, Orange Shirt Day became the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. AHS will be commemorating the day with reflective sessions on Thursday, September 29. (Watch the recorded presentations here.) We encourage everyone to honour September 30 as a day of personal reflection or to take part in events in your community.

*Please note: this page is moderated and any inappropriate or disrespectful content will be edited and/or removed.

Sings Many Songs Women (Pearl White Quills, Deb Green and Noreen Demeria) sang for the opening of the healing garden at the Alberta Children's Hospital, a place of refuge for patients, staff and physicians. Photo courtesy of Albert Woo

Wearing an orange shirt symbolizes the harm done to residential school students and their families, and shows a commitment to the principle that every child matters. By acknowledging and understanding the truth of the past, we can take steps to move forward towards reconciliation.

AHS has been commemorating Orange Shirt Day on September 30 for many years, to recognize the history and truthful impacts of residential schools in Alberta. The Orange Shirt Day movement started in 2013 after a Residential School Survivor spoke about having the orange shirt her grandmother bought for her taken away on her first day of school when she was 6 years old. Read her story here.

In 2021, Orange Shirt Day became the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. AHS will be commemorating the day with reflective sessions on Thursday, September 29. (Watch the recorded presentations here.) We encourage everyone to honour September 30 as a day of personal reflection or to take part in events in your community.

*Please note: this page is moderated and any inappropriate or disrespectful content will be edited and/or removed.

Discussions: All (28) Open (28)
  • A Truth and Reconciliation Journey

    almost 2 years ago
    Share A Truth and Reconciliation Journey on Facebook Share A Truth and Reconciliation Journey on Twitter Share A Truth and Reconciliation Journey on Linkedin Email A Truth and Reconciliation Journey link

    In the days leading up to the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, we encourage you to put reconciliation into action. The AHS Indigenous Wellness Core has compiled a list of ideas to support your personal journey which we will be sharing throughout the month of September.  Feel free to add to the list by sharing your ideas.

  • 1 - Get your Orange Shirt

    almost 2 years ago
    Share 1 - Get your Orange Shirt on Facebook Share 1 - Get your Orange Shirt on Twitter Share 1 - Get your Orange Shirt on Linkedin Email 1 - Get your Orange Shirt link


    To show your support, plan to wear orange and get your shirt.  Learn why we wear orange by visiting the Orange Shirt Society.

    Post a photo of yourself, your friends and family or your colleagues honouring Orange Shirt Day below.

  • 2 - Watch "Unforgotten"

    almost 2 years ago
    Share 2 - Watch "Unforgotten" on Facebook Share 2 - Watch "Unforgotten" on Twitter Share 2 - Watch "Unforgotten" on Linkedin Email 2 - Watch "Unforgotten" link

    Watch the film Unforgotten and go through resource toolkit.

    Warning:
    This is a very powerful film that may trigger an emotional response in many.
    Please reach out for support if you need to.
    The Hope For Wellness Helpline is available 24-hours a day at 1-855-242-3310. 

  • 3 - Do some local research

    almost 2 years ago
    Share 3 - Do some local research on Facebook Share 3 - Do some local research on Twitter Share 3 - Do some local research on Linkedin Email 3 - Do some local research link

    Do your research. Look into the history of your local area. Which Indigenous communities are in your local area? Make a direct connection with a local Indigenous organization or Indigenous community.

    Share what you learned below!

  • 4 - Ribbon Skirt

    almost 2 years ago
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    Learn how to make a ribbon skirt with Tala Tootoosis. If you make one, share a photo!

  • 5 - Talk to your kids about reconciliation

    almost 2 years ago
    Share 5 - Talk to your kids about reconciliation on Facebook Share 5 - Talk to your kids about reconciliation on Twitter Share 5 - Talk to your kids about reconciliation on Linkedin Email 5 - Talk to your kids about reconciliation link

    Watch this video with your kids, and then have a conversation about reconciliation. Tell us what they teach you.


  • 6 - Talk to your kids about Allyship

    almost 2 years ago
    Share 6 - Talk to your kids about Allyship on Facebook Share 6 - Talk to your kids about Allyship on Twitter Share 6 - Talk to your kids about Allyship on Linkedin Email 6 - Talk to your kids about Allyship link

    Watch this video with your kids, and then have a conversation about how to be an ally to Indigenous Peoples.  Share your ideas.


  • 7 - The Blanket Exercise

    almost 2 years ago
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    Learn about and participate in a local Kairos Blanket Exercise.

  • 8 - Make a plan

    over 1 year ago
    Share 8 - Make a plan on Facebook Share 8 - Make a plan on Twitter Share 8 - Make a plan on Linkedin Email 8 - Make a plan link

    Make a plan to honour National Day of Truth and Reconciliation on September 30th.  Tell us how you plan to commemorate the day, and share any community events with others here.

  • 9 - Watch "Braves Wear Braids"

    over 1 year ago
    Share 9 - Watch "Braves Wear Braids" on Facebook Share 9 - Watch "Braves Wear Braids" on Twitter Share 9 - Watch "Braves Wear Braids" on Linkedin Email 9 - Watch "Braves Wear Braids" link

    Watch Braves Wear Braidsa documentary that looks at the spiritual meaning of braids.