2021 National Indigenous Peoples Celebrations

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Thank you for joining us to celebrate the 2021 National Indigenous Peoples Day. Visit Alberta Health Services' Indigenous Health Program  to learn more.



On June 21, Canada will celebrate National Indigenous Peoples Day.

First celebrated in 1996, National Indigenous Peoples Day is a day to recognize and celebrate the cultures and contributions of Indigenous Peoples from across Canada.

This year, AHS Celebrated Resilience through Reconciliation by hosting online events throughout the month of June (see all the events here). Thank you to all who took part in the online events.



We encourage you to continue the celebration by sharing your images and stories of strength and resilience. You can also check out the presentations that were given here.

"My mask is called "In Spirit". I have chosen the base color as navy blue with an infinity symbol and beaded Métis flower designs representing Métis peoples. The tulips represent love for all my relations. Focusing on the beauty of nature and in life creates a positive mindset needed to endure our struggles. The mask is surrounded by colors of the medicine wheel in recognition of Indigenous ways of knowing, being and doing.
"This mask is a reminder to return to your spirit, to your culture, your ceremonies, your traditions, your language and your relations to overcome daily challenges. In this way, we may find peace, hope and purpose."

Lisa L'Hirondelle, Métis Cree



On June 21, Canada will celebrate National Indigenous Peoples Day.

First celebrated in 1996, National Indigenous Peoples Day is a day to recognize and celebrate the cultures and contributions of Indigenous Peoples from across Canada.

This year, AHS Celebrated Resilience through Reconciliation by hosting online events throughout the month of June (see all the events here). Thank you to all who took part in the online events.



We encourage you to continue the celebration by sharing your images and stories of strength and resilience. You can also check out the presentations that were given here.

"My mask is called "In Spirit". I have chosen the base color as navy blue with an infinity symbol and beaded Métis flower designs representing Métis peoples. The tulips represent love for all my relations. Focusing on the beauty of nature and in life creates a positive mindset needed to endure our struggles. The mask is surrounded by colors of the medicine wheel in recognition of Indigenous ways of knowing, being and doing.
"This mask is a reminder to return to your spirit, to your culture, your ceremonies, your traditions, your language and your relations to overcome daily challenges. In this way, we may find peace, hope and purpose."

Lisa L'Hirondelle, Métis Cree

Thank you for joining us to celebrate the 2021 National Indigenous Peoples Day. Visit Alberta Health Services' Indigenous Health Program  to learn more.

  • Grieving together for 215 Indigenous children, their families and communities

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    Recently, Canada was faced with the horrific discovery of 215 Indigenous children found near the site of Canada’s largest residential school in Kamloops, BC.

    Because of the courage of residential school survivors and their families, we know some of the horrors that happened at residential schools; however, we can never prepare ourselves for this type of heart wrenching discovery.

    Everyone at AHS is collectively grieving the loss of these children and are mourning with their families and communities as we remember the travesties that occurred in Canada’s residential schools.

    We express our deepest sympathies to everyone who has been impacted, and hope we can honour the memories of those lost and those still living with the trauma through truth and reconciliation.

    There is so much more work to do and we each have a role to play. Education, awareness, learning, and a commitment to do better can unite us on a path forward.

    Flags at all AHS sites are at half staff to honour the children from Kamloops and all those who never returned home.